Valhalla Legends Forums Archive | Politics | Terrorism

AuthorMessageTime
RebbyI hope the NSA isn't monitoring us because I think Grok is really an Al-Qaeda operative.

لا ضربة لي حتى جروك
June 23, 2013, 06:58 PM
RealityRippleI hope the NSA is monitoring us because they could learn a few things.June 26, 2013, 12:09 AM
Grok
I hope the NSA isn't monitoring us because I think Grok is really an Al-Qaeda operative.

لا ضربة لي حتى جروك

Who is this Grok you speak of?

What most amazes me about the Snowden leaks are the security policies which allowed him access to so much information.  After the Walker spy campaign came to light in the 80s, the US Navy and the entire DOD implemented the "need to know" requirement to strengthen the traditional clearance structures.

Before, if a held secret was categorized as "top secret", for example, anyone who held a current Top Secret clearance could assert they were allowed to know the information.  That's how the Walker's continually stole information on our submarine program, and I believe, many non-submarine programs.

"Need to know" was about the holder of the information being responsible for making the determination whether the requester had the need to know the held secrets.  The requester could not override simply by his own assertion.

So what the hell was the NSA, which should have the most extensive library of security knowledge in this corner of the universe, doing with a policy that allowed Snowden access to so many documents?  It's completely baffling.  LOTS of people had to fail for this to happen.  They should all be fired, and by fired I don't mean reassigned.  Their government paycheck days need to end.  Furthermore, they shouldn't be allowed to work for any defense contractor.  Their failures are grievous in the worst way.

That said, now my opinion on the exposed information.
1)  My government damn well better be spying on our enemies.
2)  My government damn well better be spying on our friends, to make sure they're still friends, and give us competitive edges in treaties and other negotiations.
3)  The people of America, from which the power to self-govern has come, decided early on and clearly stated they wanted our federal government to not have the legal authority to spy on citizens without suspicion, warrant, and judicial oversight.  Going to a secret court and making secret laws that affect people who cannot challenge the Constitutionality of those laws (in order to challenge, you require standing and the knowledge that you are being affected) is cowardly and an abuse of FISA's intent.  At a minimum, it's not what American citizens want their lawmakers doing.  At worst, it is or should be  unconstitutional.
July 14, 2013, 10:33 PM
Invert
Who is this Grok you speak of?

What most amazes me about the Snowden leaks are the security policies which allowed him access to so much information.  After the Walker spy campaign came to light in the 80s, the US Navy and the entire DOD implemented the "need to know" requirement to strengthen the traditional clearance structures.

Before, if a held secret was categorized as "top secret", for example, anyone who held a current Top Secret clearance could assert they were allowed to know the information.  That's how the Walker's continually stole information on our submarine program, and I believe, many non-submarine programs.

"Need to know" was about the holder of the information being responsible for making the determination whether the requester had the need to know the held secrets.  The requester could not override simply by his own assertion.

So what the hell was the NSA, which should have the most extensive library of security knowledge in this corner of the universe, doing with a policy that allowed Snowden access to so many documents?  It's completely baffling.  LOTS of people had to fail for this to happen.  They should all be fired, and by fired I don't mean reassigned.  Their government paycheck days need to end.  Furthermore, they shouldn't be allowed to work for any defense contractor.  Their failures are grievous in the worst way.

That said, now my opinion on the exposed information.
1)  My government damn well better be spying on our enemies.
2)  My government damn well better be spying on our friends, to make sure they're still friends, and give us competitive edges in treaties and other negotiations.
3)  The people of America, from which the power to self-govern has come, decided early on and clearly stated they wanted our federal government to not have the legal authority to spy on citizens without suspicion, warrant, and judicial oversight.  Going to a secret court and making secret laws that affect people who cannot challenge the Constitutionality of those laws (in order to challenge, you require standing and the knowledge that you are being affected) is cowardly and an abuse of FISA's intent.  At a minimum, it's not what American citizens want their lawmakers doing.  At worst, it is or should be  unconstitutional.

I agree with this 100 percent. Very well put, Grok.
July 15, 2013, 03:08 PM
MysT_DooMhm that made senseJuly 15, 2013, 03:59 PM